Friday, 28 September 2012

Water, water everywhere

On Tuesday, I struggled to get to work. The road I usually take was closed. I took an alternative route. Even so, the dips in the road were full of intimidatingly deep pools of water. By mid morning the outlook was so bad we went home. The surface water was terrifying. I left my car in a layby, put on my wellingtons and set off home on foot with my cello and an umbrella.

The first innundated dip in the road I came to turned out to be deeper than my boots but so what I thought. At least nobody drove through the water as I was walking through it and flooded wellingtons are completely trivial compared with a flooded house. I squelched on. I got to our village to discover that the beck had turned into an even bigger torrent than usual on such days. The wellingtons were overwhelmed again as I cautiously made my way through it, the torrent being the road to our house.

We were lucky. The water hadn't risen high enough to flood the house. Other houses were not so lucky. Usually the beck only rises high enough to impress us all with the awesome power of Nature. This time it brought misery pure and simple and left people wondering when it'll happen again and if it could be even worse.

When the water level finally fell, it revealed a road stripped down to its foundations...









9 comments:

tony said...

I'm Glad You Escaped The House Flooding.......What A Terrible Summer we've all had.

The Solitary Walker said...

How sensible of you to have a pair of wellington boots in the car, Dominic! I'm glad your house was spared this time, but I fear there will be more inundations, and perhaps even worse ones, in the future.

Gwil W said...

Thanks for your report Dominic. I can imagine you with umbrella, cello, wellington boots and rubber duck making your way through the raging waters.

Where's Noah when we need him? I think we should be told.

hyperCRYPTICal said...

Glad you escaped a house flooding too.

Water penetration caused a problem at work - but throught the eaves - pooling in roof spaces, setting of the fire alarm and shorting the electricity supply...

What fun!

Anna :o]

Rachel Fox said...

Thought it was going to go a bit Winnie the Pooh with the umbrella there for a minute. Glad your house is ok. Amazing pics of the road!
x

Tom Stephenson said...

Hmmm - extreme! That looks like a split gas main shroud in the top picture. No bubbles though.

Get Off My Lawn! said...

Oh dear. I went through a bad flood once. A friend of mine lost a stand-up bass and an old Gibson acoustic handed down from her dad. I hope your cello made it unscathed.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Having lived there for some time myself I can appreciate just how bad it is. Glad you are taking it in your stride so to speak - and glad also that your cottage stands a little way back from the lane - at least you didn't suffer the awful flooding of the cottages on the laneside.

Sandy's witterings said...

This must have happened during our flooded tent weekend - we sorted it but were well aware that the worst of the weather had happened further south and some people had quite a disaster on their hands. There is I'm afraid a thin line between awsome (proper meaning) and misery as far as the weather was concerned. Glad your adventure was contained to a walk in the wet in your wellies and your house remains unflooded.