Saturday, 17 September 2011

The Poetry of Margery Clute (3)

On Baildon Moor

On Baildon Moor the howling wind
Is not unkind.
‘Tis city life –not moorland air-
That makes us blind.

The dingy streets confound our souls
And burden us with unnatural care!
One can see the world so clearly here.
Not so, down there.

And, I must say, I feel bereft
When I desert this mossy cleft –
As if here is all the light that’s left
In this dark world;

Even as if this wild, wide expanse
So calculated to entrance
Was (it could be worse)
The Centre of the Universe.

Margery Clute (1824-76)



The Fly

I saw a Fly.
It made me sigh.
Poor Fly!

Doomed to buzz
From Wall to Wall
Oblivious to the Rise and Fall
Of Humankind.

It doesn't mind
At all.

Margery Clute (1824-76)

If you missed the first installment, which provided some background information regarding Margery Clute's poetry, you can read it here.

7 comments:

George said...

Perhaps Margery did not enjoy London as much as we thought. She seems to prefer the country life, and she speaks enviously of the fly's ability to get on with its life without regard to the rise and fall of mankind. It's difficult for me to disagree with either of these sentiments.

The Weaver of Grass said...

You really do begin to see why Margery faded into obscurity don't you?

Gerry Snape said...

I hope that they will revive her books? there were books I hope!!!

John Hayes said...

Margery is at it again--how fun!

patteran said...

For a poet who laboured in such comprehensive anonymity during her time and who has remained cloaked by history, her influence is startling. There are thematic and stylistic echoes regularly to be found amongst the poems submitted to the various poetry prompt sites. Funny old world.

patteran said...

For a poet who laboured in such comprehensive anonymity during her time and who has remained cloaked by history, her influence is startling. There are thematic and stylistic echoes regularly to be found amongst the poems submitted to the various poetry prompt sites. Funny old world.

Dominic Rivron said...

Thanks for these comments, everybody!