Saturday, 10 January 2009

A Moment

The moment I realised,
the car stopped
without so much as a jolt
and the world began
to rush past.

I was the Pole Star -
and already I could feel
the breath of The Great Bear
prowling around me
in the dark

22 comments:

The Weaver of Grass said...

Am not sure what this means.
I like the idea behind it.
I still love your comment that whilst running one evening you saw that Orion had decorated a bare tree with fairy lights. I do think that up here we seem to be closer to (and therefore almost part of) the sky.

The Weaver of Grass said...

There has been a lot of talk lately about word verification and how odd some of them are - and how appropriate. Well I have to tell you that the one I just did on my comment above was mothriv!!

The Solitary Walker said...

I'm not sure what it means either - but that doesn't stop my rather uneasy enjoyment of the poem. "The moment I realised..." What? Mmm... And why were you the Pole Star? Further to ponder here...

BYW, really liked your bookshop poem.

Rachel Fox said...

Ah what does it mean, they say...don't let Jim Murdoch know you're talking about what poems mean...he'll be round here in a shot!
I think it means you're mad as a star...but that's OK. We're all mad as something. Now what does mad mean? Hmmm.
x

Frances said...

I love the idea of being the Pole Star with the Great Bear prowling around. Its pure Philip Pullman. What's not to understand?

Dominic Rivron said...

Thanks for these comments. They got me thinking for ages.

WG: Word verification throws up some truly odd words. I even found a blog devoted to it. Mothriv (as anyone who knows who you are will appreciate)is pure synchronicity.

SW: What? What indeed... Slightly off the point, but I only found this out recently that some of the pyramids have a narrow shaft designed to admit the apparently stationary light of the pole star.

RF: "Mad" is quite a word, isn't it? Mad about football, mad with X, mad as a hatter, mad rush, etc.

Frances: I was thinking of the constellation, but you're right, Iorek Byrnison does spring to mind.

patteran said...

What a punchy second stanza, rushing us from terra firma to the reaches of deep space. Excellent.

Dominic Rivron said...

Thanks for that, Dick.

Dave King said...

I like being assailed by contradictory ideas of possible meanings. Rich in them!

Poet in Residence said...

I like the breath of the Great Bear prowling around. Maybe you were kidnapped by space aliens. It always happens when you are driving along a country road or when you are at your desk by an open wind

Dominic Rivron said...

DK: Thanks. So do I. Life's like that.

PiR: It does, doesn't it? I think I've linked to this -I think- wonderful New York Film Academy short film before, but it was a long time ago. Heavens, it's hot in he

Poet in Residence said...

I was laughing all the way through. It's hilarious. It's like a cut from a Peter Sellers movie. The guy in the black suit is simply amazing. The way his left eye stares out of the screen is alien-creepy. Many thanks!

Dominic Rivron said...

Pleased you enjoyed it. It cracks me up every time I see it. I should have added that it started life as a short story, by Terry Bisson - interesting, in that it is all dialogue.

BarbaraS said...

I love this snippet poem; do you think it's part of a bigger sequence..?

Sorlil said...

I'm thinking along the same lines as Barbara, reads to me like the start of something very interesting.

Dominic Rivron said...

I don't think it's part of a bigger poem or sequence, but I did want it to feel as if it is.

Sorlil said...

fair enough, I thought that might be a possibility.

Poet in Residence said...

It brings a whole new meaning to the phrase "I don't mince my words!"

Totalfeckineejit said...

I like that poem Domnic, it's enigmatic in an appealing way, and as I spend ages gawking up at the night skies I'm always interested in any poetic mention of them.good stuff!

Lucy Corrander said...

I like this poem but find it alarming.

When I read it, I thought I understood it but, since no-body else does, presumeably I don't either!

Thank you, Dominic, for becoming a follower of PICTURES JUST PICTURES.

Lucy Corrander

P.S. I like 'Something About the Sky' very much too. L.

Dominic said...

"Alarming"? I like it! :)

Dominic said...

TFE: I also spend time gawking at the sky - so much so my children even bought me a telescope. It's amazing what you see when you look, especially if you live somewhere where there isn't much light pollution.